Discussion:
The Speed of Politics in 1860
(too old to reply)
b***@aol.com
2007-03-07 12:14:34 UTC
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Raw Message
With only newspapers and public meetings as a means for
communication, the political machinery must have moved very quickly
back in 1860. On February 27th, 1860, Lincoln wasn't even a declared
candidate for President when he gave the Cooper Union speech. This
led to more speeches throughout New England and less than 100 days
later (May 18th), he wins the Republican nomination leading to his
election victory on November 6, of the very same year.
The Military Machinery that was created to fight in the Civil War
managed to bring the terrible conflict to an end in four years in
spite of enormous setbacks and losses.

And we think we live in a fast paced world today.

Rich Wagner
Whistler
2007-03-08 05:37:40 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
With only newspapers and public meetings as a
means for communication, the political machinery must
have moved very quickly back in 1860.
On the day after the Cooper Union adress, four New
York newspapers, The Tribune, Times, Herald and
Evening Post had printed the entire speech in their
morning editions. Not an accident because it was some
of the city's most influential editors and publishers who
had helped put together the event.
After the speech, after midnight, Lincoln went to The
Tribune Building on Park Row, which was known as
"newspaper row", went to the proofreader's office,
next to the presses and tired as he was, carefully
edited the galleys to be sent to press, and to make
sure that the other major papers got a copy for their
own publication.
Lincoln knew the value of having his speeches in print,
and he wanted them to be right.
Post by b***@aol.com
On February
27th, 1860, Lincoln wasn't even a declared candidate
for President when he gave the Cooper Union speech.
This led to more speeches throughout New England
The speeches on the tour through the northern states
were based largely edited copies of the original CU
address, and these rewrites were most likely were the
first of his papers to be carried inside his new
stovepipe hat.
Incidently, Lincoln bought the hat, according to record,
on September 27, 1860, at the Knox Great Hat and
Cap Establishment at 212 Broadway, corner of Fulton
St. (price unknown)...
Whistler
2007-03-08 05:41:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@aol.com
With only newspapers and public meetings as a
means for communication, the political machinery must
have moved very quickly back in 1860.
On the day after the Cooper Union adress, four New
York newspapers, The Tribune, Times, Herald and
Evening Post had printed the entire speech in their
morning editions. Not an accident because it was some
of the city's most influential editors and publishers who
had helped put together the event.
After the speech, after midnight, Lincoln went to The
Tribune Building on Park Row, which was known as
"newspaper row", went to the proofreader's office,
next to the presses and tired as he was, carefully
edited the galleys to be sent to press, and to make
sure that the other major papers got a copy for their
own publication.
Lincoln knew the value of having his speeches in print,
and he wanted them to be right.
Post by b***@aol.com
On February
27th, 1860, Lincoln wasn't even a declared candidate
for President when he gave the Cooper Union speech.
This led to more speeches throughout New England
The speeches on the tour through the northern states
were based largely on edited copies of the original CU
address, and these rewrites were most likely were the
first of his papers to be carried inside his new
stovepipe hat.
Incidently, Lincoln bought the hat, according to record,
on September 27, 1860, at the Knox Great Hat and
Cap Establishment at 212 Broadway, corner of Fulton
St. (price unknown)...

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